Study confirms intimate partner violence leading health risk factor for women

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Study confirms intimate partner violence leading health risk factor for women

Home Forums WASHN eYarning Resources Study confirms intimate partner violence leading health risk factor for women

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  • #3293

    WASHN Team
    Keymaster

    A preventable burden

    Front-line services, such as the police, women’s refuges and counselling and support services play a vital role, reducing exposure to violence and its health consequences by helping women to secure safety, supporting their recovery, and holding men who use violence accountable. Recent inquiries in Victoria and Queensland show that although such services have improved, much more needs to be done.

    Another effective way to reduce the burden is to prevent “new cases” of partner violence, by tackling its underlying causes. These are increasingly well understood, along with the means to address them.

    Among these factors is inequality between men and women, an influence made particularly potent when coupled with poverty, social exclusion and other forms of discrimination.
    Thankyou ABC News- full story here

    #3294

    WASHN Team
    Keymaster

    Intimate partner violence, including violence in both cohabiting and non-cohabiting relationships and emotional abuse: •is prevalent–affecting one in three women since the age of 15. One in four women have experienced violence or abuse from a cohabiting partner. If we only consider physical and sexual violence, then one in six women have experienced at least one incident of violence by a cohabiting partner;
    •has serious impacts for women’s health–contributing to a range of negative health outcomes, including poor mental health, problems during pregnancy and birth, alcohol and illicit drug use, suicide, injuries and homicide;
    •contributes an estimated 5.1 percent to the disease burden in Australian women aged 18-44 years and 2.2% of the burden in women of all ages;
    •contributes more to the burden than any other risk factor in women aged 18-44 years, more than well known risk factors like tobacco use, high cholesterol or use of illicit drugs;
    •is estimated to contribute five times more to the burden of disease among Indigenous than non-Indigenous women;
    •is estimated to make a larger contribution than any other risk factor to the gap in the burden between Indigenous and non-Indigenous women aged 18-44 years;2 and
    •has serious consequences for the development and wellbeing of children living with violence.

    Thankyou SHineSA http://sasha.shinesa.org.au/?p=2128

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